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I was lucky enough to have the best dad in the entire world, (sorry other dads but it’s true) and he was a Sound Desginer for the theatre, that gave me back stage access to a magical world of make believe that made me who I am today. I was also lucky enough to train for three years at drama school that gave me my ride or die friends for life. Then I was lucky enough to be a part of the best cast in the entire world (sorry other casts but it’s true) and perform the best play in the entire world (sorry other plays but it’s true) The Seagull by Anton Chekov. I was lucky enough to work with the best director in the world (sorry other directors but it’s true) @jamielloyd I was also lucky enough to be born optimistic, glass half full kinda gal. And I knew the night we waved each other goodbye (gin in hand) we would be seeing each other soon, the show would go on. The true spellbinding magic that is telling stories on stage has been my life’s blood passed down through my darling dad and I cannot fathom a world where this art form does not exist. #savethearts has never been more important, we need it, we need it, we need it, without stories to tell I don’t know how we can find our own places of safety and escapism, empathy and love. I know if my favourite human in the world, my dad, were alive today he would be telling me the exact same thing. For him, for all the creatives and crews it takes to tell an audience a story in whatever form they choose, let’s #savethearts #❤️
It is with great honour I present to you my beautiful talented work wife and love @nathalieemmanuel reading the incredible words of Maya Angelou. This reading brought tears to my eyes. Nat would like to dedicate this reading to the global black community, to each and everyone who has been affected by anti-black racism, and the families of those who have lost their kin to the systemic hate that still governs and populates our communities. I am so proud to be able to share this with you all. Hear these words and applaud her now. The prescription as it reads in the book is this: For the condition of Oppression: To maintain one’s strength in the face of the erosive power of oppression can take unbelievable resilience. Maya Angelou’s wonderful poem ‘Still I Rise’ summons exactly that fortitude. As a black woman born in the United States of America in the 1920’s, Angelou knew more than her fair share of racism and it’s power to stifle hope. Yet her generation is the one that finally overcame the segregationist Jim Crow laws and brought civil rights to people of colour in the USA. The battle is far from over- people in every country on earth are battered by racism on a daily basis- but Angelou’s poem remains as a rallying call to maintain hope and stand tall. It is in the human spirit to overcome. You may be trampled into the dirt, but still, like dust, you’ll rise. Wherever you are, and whatever difficulties you face, remember that your internal world is always solely your own. Perhaps you have been robbed of your metaphorical, or even your literal, treasures; perhaps your ancestors were robbed of their very freedom. Still, as Angelou reminds us, dignity and determination in the face of oppression can become weapons; and pride and strength are a rebellion in themselves. Your gold mines survive in your laugh, and your diamonds in your dance. Nobody can take those from you. Thank you thank you @nathalieemmanuel for your magic! 🕊❤️🥰🙏🏻 @thepoetrypharmacy @thepoetryremedy
The magical beautiful Thandie Newton graces us with Love after Love by Derek Walcott. Her charity of choice is @vdayorg an brilliant organisation I urge you to check them out! Thandie we love you and your incredible talent! Here is the prescription as it reads in @thepoetrypharmacy @thepoetryremedy Condition: Intertia When Alone I see a lot of people in my Pharmacy sessions who tell me that they can’t do anything when they’re on their own. IF they had a visitor, they could entertain: cook, buy food, be cheerful and welcoming. Yet somehow the motivation to do this for themselves is very hard to come by. Left alone, they don’t believe that they’re worth the effort. Similarly, I meet person after person who funnels all their energy into helping and caring for others, yet has no regard for their own wellbeing. It’s as if they see themselves as the only people on earth not deserving of love and kindness. There’s a fundamental unfairness in this: a sense that people are wilfully selling themselves short. It seems to me that a crucial objective of existence is to come to terms with oneself. Learning to like ourselves is something we all battle with, young and old. It’s a constant, permanent progression, and it’s never truly complete. But when you can look yourself in the eye and actually cherish yourself- when you can recognise who you are with all your faults, and be happy with that- then you’ll see that you are no less worthy of kindness than your friends and guests. You’ll be able to speak kindly and politely to yourself, no longer tearing yourself down as you might an enemy, but instead bolstering and encouraging yourself as you would anyone else. We devote so much time to self-analysis in our modern lives, to wondering why we aren’t happy or whether other people see our flaws as plainly as we do. Many of us resort to pills and alcohol, and sometimes even less healthy habits, just to keep ourselves in some semblance of balance. Yet all most of us really need is to come to terms with who we are. Unfortunately, there is not an over-the-counter remedy for this. Fortunately, however, it is entirely within our grasp. Thank you thank you @thandienewton ❤️🙏🏻
The beautiful, breathtaking talent that is Andrew Scott reads for us ‘Everything is Going to be All Right’ by Derek Mahon. Andrew has asked to dedicate this to Men Against Cancer Ireland https://macprostatecancersupport.ie/men-against-cancer/ Andrew we salute you! 🕺 It comes under the prescription for need for reassurance. Here’s how it reads as written in the book @thepoetrypharmacy @thepoetryremedy There are moments in life when the banal suddenly, and quite without warning, becomes the transcendent. Perhaps a shaft of afternoon light paints a familiar view an unfamiliar gold; perhaps dust in a sunbeam or the dance of sparks above a fire transport you, for a long instant, to somewhere else altogether. The almost magical-seeming reflections of ripples on a ceiling are transfixing in just the same way. In moments like these- awe-struck moments when the ferocious beauty of the everyday catches us unawares- we are often moved to a reassessment. One flash of sunlight can be all it takes to give us the sense of possibility that can change everything. As a great sufferer from depression myself, I find a small moment like this, a sudden splash of serenity and beauty, can provide the impetus needed to run my mood around. Not completely, perhaps, and not permanently- but sometimes a small push is all any of us is waiting for. Derek Mahon’s poem ‘Everything is Going to be All Right’ describes wonderfully the feeling of that little push and reassessment. And there’s something hugely powerful, too, about its final line. When my children are suffering and I hold them in my arms, it seems to be the most natural mantra in the world: Everything will be all right. There’s a comfort to those words, whether or not they’ll prove to be true. OF course, some wounds don’t heal, and some wrongs go un-righted. But in the grander sense, in the everything sense, things to tend to be all right. Too often, our pain is either in our heads or magnified beyond all proportion. If we can learn to manage it, if we can find that oasis of calm in the reflection of the waves, then we might find that out problems are not as all-consuming as we imagined. Thank you thank you Andrew!